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The Slingsbys

Letters

General Fleetwood to H. Cromwell, lord deputy of Ireland.


In the possession of the right hon. the earl of Shelburn. Dear Brother, We are now preparing for the high court of justice, which sitts to-morrow, wheare are to be tryed Dr. Hewett, Mr. Mordant, Sir Henry Slingsby, Mr. Smyth, and Mr. John Russell, Sir Richard Willis, Sir William Compton, and severall others; wheare I doubt not but they will finde impartiall justice. The Lord make it a warning to others, and of use to us, to see how little we are to trust to the fayre pretension of som mens kindnes, unlesse they have hade hearts and hands in or to the work! For surely our worke is of that nature, that will discover persons not to be long friends to it nor us, unlesse they have princeples in some measure sutable to it. The buysness of Ostend you will heare what the issue is therof. They begin this campaigne with very ill successe. I wish we may have a beter account of our men this then the last yeare. Our men begin to be very unwilling to goe upon that service. His highnes is not as yet com to a resolution as to the time of parliment; the delay of which, I feare, will put us upon some extremityes, by reason of our extraordinary wants of moneyes, which treade so fast upon our heeles in all our affayres, that I confesse I know not what will becom of us, unlesse the parliment will suddenly answer our occasion. I do beleive we spend as litle of the states moneyes but upon publicke occasions, as ever any did; but the truth is, our expences and occasions for moneyes are extraordinary, and we canot with safety retrench them. Ther is 2 or 3 auncient ministers, Dr. Tate, Mr. Fayrfull, formerly a minister in Tyrron, and another, whose name I know not, out of Willshire, all of them, because of my former relation to Ireland, do desire each of them 50 l. advance. I know not the gentlemen as to know their gifts and holynes, neither can I tell what direction you give about their advance-moneyes. Dr. Tate, I understand, is perticulerly invited by yourselfe; and therefore you are, I presume, fully satisfyed in him. I intreat to know.
May 24. [1657.]


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